Study of Time - Kenneth Koch

gloomy-planets:

One bird deserves another. One white and orange tabletop.
One twenty-five-year-old deserves another
Twenty-five-year-old. One harlequin deserves another harlequin. One
    rich cocktail of flames deserves another
And one extravagant boast: I am the Obvious. My hunch is me.
One brain deserves a brain that has been hatched in the tropics
One broken heart a heart that has been differently broken.
It seems to me time to get something done. But if I get in the car
I am forty-five years old and you are nineteen. We are
Not going anywhere. The car won’t start. And if I get out
I am sixty years old. I look around but don’t see you there.
I expect it’s a good presumption that you are coming back,
But hurry. If I go into the drugstore
I am thirty-three. The boy behind the counter
Is not a girl, but we discuss national politics anyway.
That fucking Nixon. Or That damned unholy war! If I read a magazine
At the stand, on the other side of the drugstore,
I am twenty-five, and you, dressed with some hoop-la, come in.
I am sixteen when I am lying on the floor, with you beside me
Reading a newspaper. One stone man
Deserves one stone woman, and one glad day of being alone
And in good health. If at seventy
I get up and close the door,
I am fourteen and you are twenty. I’ll put on
My blue shirt. My white tie, I’m twenty, twenty-one. Now we are eighty.
One five o’clock sunny day
Deserves another. We are both fifty-four. You pick up the bar that holds
    the door
And hit it as hard as you can at twenty. The floor deserves the floor
Of heaven that is a ceiling as we see it. One coldly affected group
Deserves another. We both very much enjoy engaging in sports.
You fall down, I pick you up. I am eight
You are sixty-six. Today is your birthday. You stand opening a cantaloupe.
    You say, Let’s
Try another! You are sitting in the car,
You are twenty-three, I am forty-four and singing a Spanish song.
If she is nine years old, then I am fifty.
The birthdays come and go talking of Prospero. Good-bye, house!
Do you remember when we used to live in you
And be forty-eight years old? One age deserves another. One time
    deserves another time.

Reblogged from trashing days

hookedonsemiotics:

growing-orbits:

O Me! O Life!

O Me! O life!… of the questions of these recurring;   
Of the endless trains of the faithless—of cities fill’d with the foolish;   
Of myself forever reproaching myself, (for who more foolish than I, and who  more faithless?)   
Of eyes that vainly crave the light—of the objects mean—of the struggle ever renew’d;   
Of the poor results of all—of the plodding and sordid crowds I see around me;          
Of the empty and useless years of the rest—with the rest me intertwined;   
The question, O me! so sad, recurring—What good amid these, O me, O life?   
   
                                                        Answer.

That you are here—that life exists, and identity;   
That the powerful play goes on, and you will contribute a verse.

Walt Whitman (thanks for the reminder, Marion)

Walt Whitman is incredible and I will fight anyone who says otherwise

Reblogged from
Tags: poetry text
ivorysprite:

Frank O’Hara

ivorysprite:

Frank O’Hara

Reblogged from Bug
timeimmemorial:

Peter Gizzi
Reblogged from
Tags: text poetry
Ghassan Kanafani with my morning coffee.
I want to share this excerpt from the introduction to this collection. It’s from a letter Kanafani wrote to his son:

I heard you in the other room asking your mother: “Mama, am I Palestinian?” When she answered “Yes”, a heavy silence fell on the whole house. It was as if something hanging over our heads had fallen, its noise exploding, then — silence.
Afterwards… I heard you crying. I could not move. There was something bigger than my awareness being born in the other room through your bewildered sobbing. It was as if a blessed scalpel was cutting up your chest an putting there the heart that belongs to you… I was unable to move to see what was happening in the other room. I knew, however, that a distant homeland was being born again; hills, plains, olive groves, dead people, torn banners and folded ones, all cutting their way into a future of flesh and blood and being born in the heart of another child…
Do not believe that man grows. No; he is born suddenly — a word, in a moment, penetrates his heart to a new throb. One scene can hurl him down from the ceiling of childhood on to the ruggedness of the road

Ghassan Kanafani with my morning coffee.

I want to share this excerpt from the introduction to this collection. It’s from a letter Kanafani wrote to his son:

I heard you in the other room asking your mother: “Mama, am I Palestinian?” When she answered “Yes”, a heavy silence fell on the whole house. It was as if something hanging over our heads had fallen, its noise exploding, then — silence.

Afterwards… I heard you crying. I could not move. There was something bigger than my awareness being born in the other room through your bewildered sobbing. It was as if a blessed scalpel was cutting up your chest an putting there the heart that belongs to you… I was unable to move to see what was happening in the other room. I knew, however, that a distant homeland was being born again; hills, plains, olive groves, dead people, torn banners and folded ones, all cutting their way into a future of flesh and blood and being born in the heart of another child…

Do not believe that man grows. No; he is born suddenly — a word, in a moment, penetrates his heart to a new throb. One scene can hurl him down from the ceiling of childhood on to the ruggedness of the road

When “left” is viewed as everything, it actually ends up amounting to very little. This “everything is left and everyone is leftist” approach in part characterizes what has been happening to the left in a post-industrialized world, and what in part explains the decline of the left in the past several decades.. In other words, who are we, what do we believe in, and what defines our struggle (i.e., the contours of membership, principles, and action) are questions to which answers have become so radically different among supposed adherents to leftist principles. But, to make a very long story (dissertation long) extremely short, “left” is not everything, and distinctions can be made among the values of the “left” to avoid flattening this category. On the one hand, the prioritization of “leftist” principles, struggles, and action is important. On the other hand, this prioritization cannot happen in a discursive or contextual vacuum. It must be based in practice in order to avoid naive, hypocritical, and/or oppressive dogmatism. For example, the triumph of the working classes (don’t hold your breath) does not give a carte blanche to the ostensible leadership of this new classless collective, nor is it the end of “politics” or “privilege.” More practically, prioritizing the bigger culprit is the sound approach, but not in all cases and without attention to detail.
Tags: Syria text
give your daughters difficult names. give your daughters names that command the full use of tongue. my name makes you want to tell me the truth. my name doesn’t allow me to trust anyone that cannot pronounce it right.
— warsan shire. (via afrosandpeeptoes)
Reblogged from
Tags: text
maozedongisnotcool:

cosmopolitan-fascist:

maozedongisnotcool:

from Freedom in a Regulatory State?: Lawrence, Marriage and Biopolitics

this might be a dumb question but what type of activism would ‘make redistribution a central goal?’ tldr what should we be doing instead?

tldr? I linked to the paper and it touches on answering your question. Mainstream LGBT activism squanders most of its resources on inclusion in the regulatory politics the state exerts over bodies. This disregards issues of race, class, and institutional violence occurring at the intersections thereof. Resources in queer activism should aim at attacking the loci of power exerted over people affected most: People in prisons, foster care, juvenile justice, people with access to healthcare via Amerigroup or Benefit (other Medicare services), people working low wage jobs or surviving on benefits, people struggling against immigration policies or the intersection of gender discrimination and racism.
tldr, supporting legalization of homonormative marriage renders the issue into one about people who are discriminated mainly on the basis of sexuality. Not gender, not race, not class. It’s not a concession or a short-term so-called pragmatic victory in the face of realpolitik. It’s an investment in and a compromise with the very institutions that harm queer people who face the most discrimination, violence, and poverty.

maozedongisnotcool:

cosmopolitan-fascist:

maozedongisnotcool:

from Freedom in a Regulatory State?: Lawrence, Marriage and Biopolitics

this might be a dumb question but what type of activism would ‘make redistribution a central goal?’ tldr what should we be doing instead?

tldr? I linked to the paper and it touches on answering your question. Mainstream LGBT activism squanders most of its resources on inclusion in the regulatory politics the state exerts over bodies. This disregards issues of race, class, and institutional violence occurring at the intersections thereof. Resources in queer activism should aim at attacking the loci of power exerted over people affected most: People in prisons, foster care, juvenile justice, people with access to healthcare via Amerigroup or Benefit (other Medicare services), people working low wage jobs or surviving on benefits, people struggling against immigration policies or the intersection of gender discrimination and racism.

tldr, supporting legalization of homonormative marriage renders the issue into one about people who are discriminated mainly on the basis of sexuality. Not gender, not race, not class. It’s not a concession or a short-term so-called pragmatic victory in the face of realpolitik. It’s an investment in and a compromise with the very institutions that harm queer people who face the most discrimination, violence, and poverty.

Reblogged from Lēthē
androphilia:

The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by Hamid Dabashi: Reading and Book Launch | NewMuseum.org
Sat, May 12, 20123:00 PMNew Museum Theater235 BoweryNew York, NY 10002212.219.1222show mapdirections: car, subway, bus
Part of Special Engagement
Free to Members, $6 General Public

This event marks the release of The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by renowned scholar and cultural critic Hamid Dabashi, published by Zed Books. Dr. Dabashi will read from the book and discuss recent developments on this topic in Syria and Bahrain.
The Arab Spring analyzes the causes of the Arab Spring in its many different locations, drawing on the geopolitics and history of the region and also the international context to establish how and why these revolutionary forces were able to galvanize in this way at this moment.
Pointing to a “delayed defiance” against postcolonialism, Dabashi makes a compelling case that the Arab Spring signifies no less than an end to postcolonialism in the region and the arrival of a new era in Middle Eastern history and politics. He also effectively demonstrates what this will mean for the rest of the world. The Arab Spring is the book to read to unpack the huge significance of the events that we have seen over the past year.
Hamid Dabashi is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, the oldest and most prestigious Chair in the field. He has taught and delivered lectures in many North and Latin American, European, Arab, and Iranian universities. He is a founding member of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, as well as a founding member of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University. He has written twenty books, edited four, and contributed chapters to many more. He is also the author of over 100 essays, articles, and book reviews in major scholarly and peer-reviewed journals on subjects ranging from Iranian Studies, medieval and modern Islam, comparative literature, world cinema, and the philosophy of art (trans-aesthetics). A selected sample of his writing is co-edited by Andrew Davison and Himadeep Muppidi, The World is my Home: A Hamid Dabashi Reader (Transaction, 2010). Dabashi is the series editor of “Literatures and Cultures of the Islamic World” for Palgrave Macmillan and the founder of Dreams of a Nation, a Palestinian Film Project, dedicated to preserving and safeguarding Palestinian Cinema.
Sponsors
Education and public programs are made possible by a generous grant from Goldman Sachs Gives at the recommendation of David and Hermine Heller.
Copyright © 2012 New Museum Of Contemporary Art. All Rights Reserved.


So curious about this.

androphilia:

The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by Hamid Dabashi: Reading and Book Launch | NewMuseum.org

Sat, May 12, 2012
3:00 PM
New Museum Theater
235 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
212.219.1222
show map
directions: car, subway, bus

Part of Special Engagement

Free to Members, $6 General Public

This event marks the release of The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by renowned scholar and cultural critic Hamid Dabashi, published by Zed Books. Dr. Dabashi will read from the book and discuss recent developments on this topic in Syria and Bahrain.

The Arab Spring analyzes the causes of the Arab Spring in its many different locations, drawing on the geopolitics and history of the region and also the international context to establish how and why these revolutionary forces were able to galvanize in this way at this moment.

Pointing to a “delayed defiance” against postcolonialism, Dabashi makes a compelling case that the Arab Spring signifies no less than an end to postcolonialism in the region and the arrival of a new era in Middle Eastern history and politics. He also effectively demonstrates what this will mean for the rest of the world. The Arab Spring is the book to read to unpack the huge significance of the events that we have seen over the past year.

Hamid Dabashi is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, the oldest and most prestigious Chair in the field. He has taught and delivered lectures in many North and Latin American, European, Arab, and Iranian universities. He is a founding member of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, as well as a founding member of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University. He has written twenty books, edited four, and contributed chapters to many more. He is also the author of over 100 essays, articles, and book reviews in major scholarly and peer-reviewed journals on subjects ranging from Iranian Studies, medieval and modern Islam, comparative literature, world cinema, and the philosophy of art (trans-aesthetics). A selected sample of his writing is co-edited by Andrew Davison and Himadeep Muppidi, The World is my Home: A Hamid Dabashi Reader (Transaction, 2010). Dabashi is the series editor of “Literatures and Cultures of the Islamic World” for Palgrave Macmillan and the founder of Dreams of a Nation, a Palestinian Film Project, dedicated to preserving and safeguarding Palestinian Cinema.

Sponsors

Education and public programs are made possible by a generous grant from Goldman Sachs Gives at the recommendation of David and Hermine Heller.

Copyright © 2012 New Museum Of Contemporary Art. All Rights Reserved.

So curious about this.