androphilia:

The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by Hamid Dabashi: Reading and Book Launch | NewMuseum.org
Sat, May 12, 20123:00 PMNew Museum Theater235 BoweryNew York, NY 10002212.219.1222show mapdirections: car, subway, bus
Part of Special Engagement
Free to Members, $6 General Public

This event marks the release of The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by renowned scholar and cultural critic Hamid Dabashi, published by Zed Books. Dr. Dabashi will read from the book and discuss recent developments on this topic in Syria and Bahrain.
The Arab Spring analyzes the causes of the Arab Spring in its many different locations, drawing on the geopolitics and history of the region and also the international context to establish how and why these revolutionary forces were able to galvanize in this way at this moment.
Pointing to a “delayed defiance” against postcolonialism, Dabashi makes a compelling case that the Arab Spring signifies no less than an end to postcolonialism in the region and the arrival of a new era in Middle Eastern history and politics. He also effectively demonstrates what this will mean for the rest of the world. The Arab Spring is the book to read to unpack the huge significance of the events that we have seen over the past year.
Hamid Dabashi is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, the oldest and most prestigious Chair in the field. He has taught and delivered lectures in many North and Latin American, European, Arab, and Iranian universities. He is a founding member of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, as well as a founding member of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University. He has written twenty books, edited four, and contributed chapters to many more. He is also the author of over 100 essays, articles, and book reviews in major scholarly and peer-reviewed journals on subjects ranging from Iranian Studies, medieval and modern Islam, comparative literature, world cinema, and the philosophy of art (trans-aesthetics). A selected sample of his writing is co-edited by Andrew Davison and Himadeep Muppidi, The World is my Home: A Hamid Dabashi Reader (Transaction, 2010). Dabashi is the series editor of “Literatures and Cultures of the Islamic World” for Palgrave Macmillan and the founder of Dreams of a Nation, a Palestinian Film Project, dedicated to preserving and safeguarding Palestinian Cinema.
Sponsors
Education and public programs are made possible by a generous grant from Goldman Sachs Gives at the recommendation of David and Hermine Heller.
Copyright © 2012 New Museum Of Contemporary Art. All Rights Reserved.


So curious about this.

androphilia:

The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by Hamid Dabashi: Reading and Book Launch | NewMuseum.org

Sat, May 12, 2012
3:00 PM
New Museum Theater
235 Bowery
New York, NY 10002
212.219.1222
show map
directions: car, subway, bus

Part of Special Engagement

Free to Members, $6 General Public

This event marks the release of The Arab Spring: The End of Postcolonialism by renowned scholar and cultural critic Hamid Dabashi, published by Zed Books. Dr. Dabashi will read from the book and discuss recent developments on this topic in Syria and Bahrain.

The Arab Spring analyzes the causes of the Arab Spring in its many different locations, drawing on the geopolitics and history of the region and also the international context to establish how and why these revolutionary forces were able to galvanize in this way at this moment.

Pointing to a “delayed defiance” against postcolonialism, Dabashi makes a compelling case that the Arab Spring signifies no less than an end to postcolonialism in the region and the arrival of a new era in Middle Eastern history and politics. He also effectively demonstrates what this will mean for the rest of the world. The Arab Spring is the book to read to unpack the huge significance of the events that we have seen over the past year.

Hamid Dabashi is the Hagop Kevorkian Professor of Iranian Studies and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York, the oldest and most prestigious Chair in the field. He has taught and delivered lectures in many North and Latin American, European, Arab, and Iranian universities. He is a founding member of the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, as well as a founding member of the Center for Palestine Studies at Columbia University. He has written twenty books, edited four, and contributed chapters to many more. He is also the author of over 100 essays, articles, and book reviews in major scholarly and peer-reviewed journals on subjects ranging from Iranian Studies, medieval and modern Islam, comparative literature, world cinema, and the philosophy of art (trans-aesthetics). A selected sample of his writing is co-edited by Andrew Davison and Himadeep Muppidi, The World is my Home: A Hamid Dabashi Reader (Transaction, 2010). Dabashi is the series editor of “Literatures and Cultures of the Islamic World” for Palgrave Macmillan and the founder of Dreams of a Nation, a Palestinian Film Project, dedicated to preserving and safeguarding Palestinian Cinema.

Sponsors

Education and public programs are made possible by a generous grant from Goldman Sachs Gives at the recommendation of David and Hermine Heller.

Copyright © 2012 New Museum Of Contemporary Art. All Rights Reserved.

So curious about this.

mariquon:


Introducing the Beardometer, a political sliding scale for understanding Egypt’s presidential elections.

By @Karlremarks

mariquon:

Introducing the Beardometer, a political sliding scale for understanding Egypt’s presidential elections.

By @Karlremarks

Reblogged from fattouch

Loop:

thesmellofmypyjama:

Uncle Dayton on Tumblr

Went to this art show yesterday. Haven’t seen anything serious in Palestine since a while.

“And what we have created—and I say this in humility—what we have created are new men.” – Lt. General Keith Dayton, US Security Coordinator to Israel-Palestine

“The Stories of Uncle Dayton” (2012)

Installation: TV, Publication, 16 Digital Prints 50x100

Ra’ouf Haj Yahia, Ruanne Abou-Rahme, Basel Abbas

General Dayton arrived to Palestine in 2005 with the exceptional task of not only training but also in fact building the very foundations for the Palestinian Authorities new security forces. In a speech that takes place in 2009 at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, Dayton boasts repeatedly of their success in creating new Palestinian men. Taking on the form of a children’s story book, and using a range of collected material from advertisements and brochures to iconic imagery, the work humorously deconstructs these discourses and explores the absurdities of how they are producing ‘new’ Palestinian men.

الذي حققناه وأقول هذا تواضعاً ، هو اننا صنعنا رجالاً جدداً”  - الجنرال كيث دايتون, المنسق الأمنى الأمريكي للشئون الإسرائيلية الفلسطينية 

(2012) حكايات العم دايتون

تلفزيون ، مطبوعة ، لوحات ديجيتال 100*50

رؤوف حاج يحيي، روان ابو رحمة وباسل عباس

عام 2005 ، وصل الجنرال دايتون الى فلسطين مع مهمة استثنائية ، وهي بناء الأسس الجديدة لقوات الأمن في السلطة الفلسطينية. في خطابه التلخيصي عام 2009 في معهد واشنطن لسياسة الشرق الادنى ، يفتخر دايتون مرارا من النجاح الذي حققه مع فريقه في خلق الرجال الفلسطنيين الجدد. انطلاقا من خطاب دايتون ، يقدم المشروع رؤية نقدية للاساليب والآليات التي تستخدمها القوى الاستعمارية في محاولاتها لانتاج ليس فقط لواقع جديد في المكان ، بل وإعادة تشكيل ملامح السياق الفلسطيني المعاصر، على شكل قصة اطفال تروي “حكايات العم دايتون” مبنية من مواد دعائية وكتيبات وصور ،تقوم بشكل ساخر بتفكيك هذا الخطاب لاستعراض واعادة انتاج شخصية وملامح المجتمع الفلسطيني. 

This is fantastic, thanks Bekriah. Click through the link above to download the book.

Reblogged from ؛

An Arabic Lesson

Inspired by leftist-linguaphile’s post

Some revolutionary words:
    •    revolution = ثورة = thawra
    •    liberty = حرية = hurriyya
    •    change = تغير = tagayyur
    •    nation = أمة = umma
    •    action = عمل = ‘amal
    •    resistance = مقاومة = mukawama
    •    resistance/steadfastness = صمود = sumud
    •    solidarity = تضامن = tadamon
    •    hope = أمل = amal
    •    education = ‫تعليم‬ = ta’leem
    •    culture = ثقافة = thakafa
    •    health = صحة = sih-ha
    •    love = حب = hubb
    •    humanity = الإنسانية = al-insaaniyya
    •    the people = الشعب = al-sha’ab

I listen to the ongoing debates in MENA trying to define culture and identity and I smirk. I am reminded of when Ben Bella, upon his release from prison in 1962, declared: “Nous sommes des Arabes, des Arabes, des Arabes!” One of his aides, standing by, said: “ça va finir par être vrai.”
— My professor’s facebook status.
Do not assume that gender politics or feminist concerns come in neat packages easily legible to the trained eye. Instead, allow your research to expand your own view of what a “feminist politics” may be. It could be, for example, that protests against neoliberal market restructuring in Egypt are understood within a broad political framework that includes notions of gender justice. As Saba Mahmood and Lila Abu Lughod have taught us, liberal feminism’s assumptions as to what constitute “feminist politics” or “feminist causes” are at best flawed. At worst they are exercises in epistemological hegemony and the violent remaking of the world according to secular and neoliberal rights frameworks. Furthermore, do not assume that what we call the “feminist canon” is exhaustive or particular to western philosophy in that it is not constituted through a series of exclusions, hierarchies, and imperial histories. After all Simone de Beauvoir, who taught us all that a women is not born but made, also wrote in terms we now recognize as “Islamophobic” about women “under” Islam in Algeria at the time when Algeria was a French settler colony. This does not mean we should dismiss de Beauvoir, just as it would be too easy to condemn Hegel or Marx for their “views” on Africa. Rather, it is crucial to critically inhabit and navigate the reality that the western canon was, and is constituted through producing a series of “selves” and “others.”

How Not to Study Gender in the Middle East (via fattouch)

And if you’re in Toronto, you should attend this

Reblogged from fattouch